Sunday
Oct092005

Girding for grids

Steve Hamm at BusinessWeek used the IBM-Univa announcement to put in multiple plugs for our business model, grid computing, the Globus Toolkit, and open source software. 

Link: Girding for grids.

With Red Hat, the leading Linux distributor, hitting balls out of the park left and right, it's no wonder that its business model holds attraction for other startups. The latest I have come across is Univa Corp., a months-old Chicago-based startup that's trying to do for grid computing what Red Hat has done for PC servers.

Univa takes the open-source Globus Toolkit, which is used for stitching together vast armies of servers, and packages it as a product suite and service suitable for the needs of large corporations. Univa picked up a huge credibility boost Oct. 3 when IBM adopted the its technology as a core piece of its grid computing offering. ...

Sunday
Oct092005

IBM and Univa Announce

Last week at GridWorld/GGF, IBM and Univa jointly announced an agreement that's been months in the making.  The best part of it is that it sets us squarely on the path to becoming the independent supplier of commercially supported Grid infrastructure technologies based on open source software. 

Link: IBM and Univa to Partner on Commercially-Supported Globus Software.

GRIDWORLD, BOSTON, Oct. 3 /PRNewswire/ -- IBM and Univa Corporation today announced a joint agreement whereby IBM will license commercial releases of Globus software from Univa, the leading provider of commercial software and professional services for open source Globus(R) software.
Under the agreement, Univa will deliver a commercially supported and enterprise-ready release of open-standard software built around the Globus Toolkit for use across IBM's eServer platforms running both AIX and Linux, including IBM eServer, iSeries, pSeries, xSeries, zSeries and BladeCenter systems. IBM will also provide Univa with product development resources and technology assets to assist in the development, delivery and support of the Univa commercial releases on IBM platforms. ...

Sunday
Oct092005

The Roadhouse Podcast

My life over the past year and a half has included a much larger portion of time on airplanes (commuting between Palo Alto and Chicago), and on trains (my contribution to the environment).   Thus, podcasts have become a part of my life.  But it wasn't until Doc mentioned Tony Steidler-Dennison's The Roadhouse that I realized the amount of indie music that's now being delivered this way.  I'm a happier commuter.  Thanks, Doc.


Monday
Jul112005

Microsoft 'hypervisor' plan takes shape

Link: Microsoft 'hypervisor' plan takes shape | Tech News on ZDNet.

Muglia said the hypervisor software will be delivered in 2007, following the debut of Longhorn Server. The new software will take advantage of virtualization technology coming from chipmakers Intel and Advanced Micro Devices next year, Muglia said.

The software will differ from Microsoft's existing Virtual Server product, Muglia said. That product runs on top of Windows and can run multiple Windows sessions. A recent update to Virtual Server allows companies to run Linux and other operating systems as well.

The new software will instead be built directly into Windows. "We will build a thin hypervisor that sits on top of the hardware and virtualizes resources like CPU and memory, so it has the ability to create OS sessions," Muglia said.

Monday
Jul112005

Microsoft Develops Own RFID Framework

Link: InformationWeek > Microsoft RFID Framework Due In '06 > Microsoft Develops Own RFID Framework > July 8, 2005.

...Microsoft's RFID framework will be encapsulated within enterprise applications, such as Microsoft's Axapta 4.0, due next year. The company also will offer its RFID object model and APIs to device manufacturers and ISVs—allowing them to plug into Microsoft's RFID framework and enabling out-of-the-box inventory tracking on the Windows platform, he said.
...
A number of partners in particular vertical industries stand to benefit from Microsoft's RFID solution, one service executive said. "This is something that end users are becoming very interested in, and it could be a good service offering for partners who service manufacturer and retail markets," said Paul Freeman, president of Coast Solutions Group, Irvine, Calif. Ken Winell, CEO of Econium, a Totowa, N.J., subsidiary of Visalign, agreed: "Lots of clients are interested in RFID, especially around the point-of-sale stuff," he said. "We are doing some really cool things with distribution and delivery solutions, so the Microsoft RFID [offering] will complement and extend that."